Sessions

Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren
KEYNOTE LUNCH SPEAKER

Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren
Broward County Court

Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren is currently the presiding County Court Judge of the Misdemeanor Mental Health Court of the 17th Judicial Circuit in Broward County, Florida. She pioneered the nation’s first therapeutic Mental Health Court in 1997 which has been dedicated to the decriminalization of persons with mental illnesses and neurological disorders. The Court defines itself as a human-rights strategy, prioritizing dignity and restorative justice goals and seeks to divert mentally ill persons, charged with misdemeanor and non-violent offenses, into community based treatment as an alternative to incarceration. Judge Lerner-Wren is an adjunct Professor for Nova Southeastern University, Center for Psychological Services, Criminal Justice Institute for Behavioral Health, Forensic Doctoral Program and New York Law School, Center for Disability Law and Human Rights. She is an expert in therapeutic jurisprudence and problem solving justice and speaks nationally and internationally on mental health courts and policy, therapeutic justice, and cultural change leadership and the law.

Decriminalizing Early Psychosis: Oregon’s Early Assessment and Support Alliance

Speakers:

Tamara Sale, MA
Director of the EASA Center for Excellence at the OHSU PSU School of Public Health

Leticia Sainz, LPC
Program Manager of Crisis Services for Multnomah County.

When teens and young adults first begin to experience psychotic illness, they often become involved with law enforcement and the courts. The goal of the EASA network is to avoid or mitigate legal involvement through proactive community education, outreach, engagement and support in these situations. This session will describe EASA, the legal involvement of EASA participants, and how EASA can be a resource to law enforcement and the legal system.
Tamara Sale


Leticia Sainz
Living with a Mental Illness and Modern, Yet Insufficient, Treatments

Speaker:

Natasha Tracy
Award-winning writer, speaker and social media consultant

A personal account of the difficulties and decisions about medication adherence from one of the foremost public speakers and writers on the subject. Natasha Tracy will discuss why a person might not want treatment even if they are very sick. She’ll talk about why people with bipolar disorder, specifically, opt to discontinue treatment and whether those who harm others have the right to refuse treatment. The rights of society vs. the rights of the individual will be discussed.
Natasha Tracy
Police Chiefs’ Perspectives on What Impacts Police Officer Behavior and Performance

Speakers:

Pete Kerns
Eugene Police (retired)

Ron Louie
Hillsboro Police (retired)

In this session, two veteran police chiefs will identify those factors that contribute and influence police officer impairment such as: misuse of force, domestic violence, suicide, citizen complaints, career self-sabotage, absenteeism and failed relationships. They will also discuss what they view as the best strategy to impact and reduce these Impairment Factors.

Areas of discussion: Officer (and military) PTSD, officer suicide, officer stress, training officers in Tactical Communication & Crisis Intervention, and mindfulness-based training/exposure as ways to reduce stress on the job.
Pete Kerns


Ron Louie
Screening of documentary film “Mothering Inside” and Q&A session

Speaker:

Brian Lindstrom
Award-winning maker of documentary films

“Mothering Inside” chronicles the experiences of incarcerated women and their children as they participate in the Family Preservation Project, a program designed to interrupt the cycle of intergenerational criminal justice involvement, poverty, and addiction, and promote healthy mother-child relationships, support successful reentry, and decrease recidivism.
Psychopathy: neuroscience and forensic implications

Speaker:

Octavio Choi, MD

Affiliate faculty member in the Psychiatry Department of Oregon Health & Science University
Director of the Forensic Evaluation Service at the Oregon State Hospital

Why do some people live lawful lives, while others gravitate toward repeated criminality? Do people choose to be moral or immoral, or is morality simply a genetically inherited function of the brain, like mathematical ability? Research suggests certain regions of the brain influence moral reasoning. Dr. Octavio Choi will explore how emerging neuroscience challenges long-held assumptions underlying the basis—and punishment—of criminal behavior.
Octavio Choi, MD, PhD
The Psychology of Hate

Panel members:

Rabbi Ariel Stone
Congregation Shir Tikvah

Mark Schorr, LPC, CADCI
private practice

Joanne Hardesty
NAACP - Portland Branch

Jeffrey Howes, JD
Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Cynthia Fowler, MD
private practice

What is at the root of hate?

Does evil exist or is it a manifestation of a broken brain?

A diverse panel of experts will discuss the origin of hate to discern the clinical patterns and discuss the implications of a clinical origin versus and political, economic, or spiritual cause.
Rabbi Ariel Stone

Mark Schorr, LPC

Jo Ann Hardesty

Jeff Howes, JD

Cynthia Fowler, MD
Understanding the Psychiatric Security Review Board: Community Supervision Best Practices

Speaker:

Sid Moore, JD
Interim Director of the Psychiatric Security Review Board

Participants will receive an Oregon forensic systems overview, including history around the insanity defense for adults and youth (GEI/REI), how a defendant asserts the insanity defense during criminal proceedings, the creation of the PSRB and its evolution since the late 1970s and typical progression of clients as it relates to PSRB supervision. Finally, a lengthy presentation on conditional release will be provided. This class will include a lecture and a panel that will discuss their own experiences with PSRB – from a patient perspective to the practitioner perspective and allow for an ample question and answer session.
Sid Moore, JD
Conditions for Individuals with Mental Illness in Multnomah County's Jails

Speakers:

Katie Burgard
Facility Services Manager at MCSO

Sarah Radcliffe, JD
Managing Attorney, Disability Rights Oregon

Michael Reese
Sheriff of Multnomah County

Advocates and public safety administrators have a shared interest in keeping people out of jail if what they really need is behavioral health services, and in improving conditions and services for people with mental illness who do end up in jail. There is broad agreement to reorient correctional operations and link individuals to a variety of external services and providers to better protect those in custody, public safety members, and the community alike.

Attendees will receive an overview of conditions and services for adults in custody with behavioral health issues and the efforts underway to coordinate and improve outcomes.

Katie Burgard
Sarah Radcliffe, JD
Mike Reese
First, Do No Harm: A Trauma Informed Approach

Speaker:

Mandy Davis, PhD, LCSW
Associate Professor of Practice, Portland State University’s School of Social Work

Participants will learn how trauma, adversity, and toxic stress impact our able to engage and provide effective practices. We will review the principles of trauma informed care and identify how our systems (criminal justice, child welfare, mental health) often retraumatize the service users preventing them from being able to attend and/or engage in appointments, proceedings, and follow through. The audience will also consider the impact of toxic stress on providers. Throughout the presentation, we will be noting common "hotspots" in justice proceedings and strategies to reduce retraumatization. We will also intersect procedural fairness and trauma informed care.
Mandy Davis, PhD, LCSW
Forensic Peer Best Practices for people with Substance Use Disorder

Speakers:

Sean Syrek, BA, BS, PSS, PRC
Forensic Peer Specialist and Peer Supervisor

Eric Martin, MAC, CADC III, CRM, CPS
Past President & Director Emeritus of the Addiction Counselor Certification Board of Oregon

The Oregon Regional Facilitation Center and the Oregon Health Authority have released a new text, "Substance Use Disorder Forensic Peer 10 Best Practices Curriculum." An author and editor of the text will review the new curriculum. Forensic peer services are a subspecialty of substance use disorder peer services. This best practice analysis is specifically designed for training purposes. Competencies with specific KSA’s (Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes) are described in checkboxes for classroom participant self‐assessment.
Sean Syrek
Eric Martin
Overview of Mental Health Courts in Oregon

Speakers:

Judge Patrick Wolke
Josephine County

Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren
Broward County

Judge Cindee S. Matyas
Clatsop County

Judge Ed Jones
Multnomah County

Judge Heather Karabeika
Clackamas County

A panel of judges discuss mental health courts in Oregon and around the nation, their development, operations and effect.
Pat Wolke, JD
Ginger Lerner-Wren, JD
Cindee S. Matyas, JD
Ed Jones, JD
Heather Karabeika, JD
Civil Commitment, Involuntary Treatment the Continuum of Mental Health Services

Speakers:

Bob Joondeph, JD
Disability Rights Oregon

Sarah Radcliffe, JD
Disability Rights Oregon

We will examine the constitutional and statutory basis for civil commitment, how the process works and the role that involuntary treatment plays in the public mental health system. Is it too easy or too hard to have a person civilly committed? What is the relationship between civil commitment and the criminal justice system? What are the benefits, costs and trauma associated with forced treatment? Should judges direct mental health care through outpatient commitment?

Attendees will learn how Oregon's civil commitment process works, its role in the overall mental health system and how it might be altered in the years ahead.
Bob Joondeph, JD
Sarah Radcliffe, JD

OLMHC – Session Schedule (PDF)